There's a new app to add that every pocket marketing warriors needs. Google Analytics is now mobile and it provides a pulse on your business all a tap away. If you're trying to learn Google Analytics it's broken down to a very simple and digestible layout. The interface is not fully complete when compared to the desktop version, but it's A LOT friendlier compared to the desktop version. This is the one app that I obsess over and it's worth checking it out yourself. Watch the quick video that demonstrate the user interface.

Acquisitions

Google Analytics iPhone Acquisitions

The mobile Acquisition tab does only 2 dozen metrics and cards you can swipe through. It goes give a nice high level overview of your traffic stats and the performance of what's going on by day, month, and custom date range. The date filter is the most prevalent banner on the top of the app.

Real time

Google Analytics iPhone Real time

The mobile Real time tab has very barebones stats. It's not the same real time session tracker with new visitors enter your site by pageviews. This tab is still important and contains the usual devices, pages, locations and events that are happening. Notice how there's the share button, this means every single card can be shared through the app to: Slack, hangouts, gmail, etc.

Audience Sidebar

Google Analytics iPhone Audience Sidebar

The mobile Audience tab follow the same flow as the rest of the UI. It has all the basic stats you see in the desktop version and frankly, I wish I could turn some of them off. A lot of these are still over the head of most end users. I would put that feature on my personal wishlist.

Acquisitions Sidebar

Google Analytics iPhone Acquisitions Sidebar

The mobile Acquisitions tab is probably the most important. I don't know why Google doesn't put it first, ACquisition is before AUdience. This has all the vital stats combined in the overview tab and breaks off into the traffic channels our websites succeed by. There's some customization with segment, but the UI is too basic for an end user to know how to manage them. I'll cover that in a later video.

Behavior Sidebar

Google Analytics iPhone Behavior Sidebar

The mobile Behavior tab is probably the second most important tab inside this app. Landing and exit pages are great, but events are truly where I do all my analysis and understand the REAL measurement that's happening on the website.

Goals

Google Analytics iPhone Goals

The mobile Goals tab is very barebones. It has a couple of cards that can be swiped and the selected numbers can bet toggled between 34 or 11.30% as in the example.

Ecommerce

Google Analytics iPhone Ecommerce

The mobile Ecommerce tab contains all the revenue rich information most business owners are craving to have by the minute. This tab alone is what makes Google Analytics for iPhone a killer app.

New Google Analytics Interface Tutorial on iPhone

There's a new app to add that every pocket marketing warriors needs. Google Analytics is now mobile and it provides a pulse on your business all a tap away. If you're trying to learn Google Analytics it's broken down to a very simple and digestible layout. The interface is not fully complete when compared to the desktop version, but it's…

Michael Zima

Welcome to the 4th video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning.

As we're learning how to approach Google Analytics we quickly learn that not all websites are created equal. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
  • What user actions do you want to track?
  • Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
  • The most important measurement theory.
  • Measurement Process
  • Understand the measurement process.
  • Objective Flow
  • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  • Measurement Planning
  • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  • Reporting Types Videos
  • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  • Top Landing Pages
  • Examples of custom reports.
  • Building Custom Reports
  • How to build custom reports.
  • Segmentation Types
  • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Objective Flow

If you want to learn Google Analytics it all comes down to understanding the objective flow.

Objective Flow: The sequence of events or actions that lead to a desired outcome.

Objective Flow Chart

The objective flow sheets is simple to construct. There's 3 columns and here's how the break down:

  1. Desired Outcome
  • What you're trying to track on the website. This is just the start to connecting all of your micro & macro conversions into the proper sequence.
  1. Where Visitors Leave
  • This is critical when trying to doing conversions optimization. Try to look at the exit page report to see what's happening and build a theory of why. This question should evolve and change over time.
  1. Where Visitors Complete Desired outcome
  • Where the actions are happening on the website. It's important to document every single action to quickly speed up implementation.

The brief example shows an explanation of a website that is seeking to measure the the subscriber performance, documenting users who never completed this action on the homepage and leave, which ultimately occurs in the sidebar.

Objective Flow Formula

The formula to build measurement questions breaks down even further to this syntax approach.

[Desired Outcome] + [Where Visitors Are Leaving] + [Where Visitors Complete Desired Outcome] = Objective Flow

Content Publisher Objective Flow

Objective Flow Content Publisher

Desired Outcome As Content Publisher

  • Which posts are seeing the most visitors?
  • Where is traffic coming from?
  • What devices are users on?
  • How long do they spend on my site?
  • When do users leave my site?

Objective Flow Content Publishers Where Visitors Leave

Where Visitors Leave As Content Publisher

  • Sort blog posts by the subdirectory of /blog
  • Review the channel report to see which sources are popular
  • Study the device report to see which devices are coming to the site
  • Use the metric of Avg. Time on Site with any of these mentioned reports
  • See where users are least engaged through the exit page tab

Objective Flow Where Visitors Complete Desired Outcome

Where Visitors Complete Desired Outcome As Content Publisher

Personalize to your own site

  • The blog is very important to study
  • Determine how different devices influence your content consumption
  • Analyze blog posts by the most time spent reading
  • Review blogs post bringing in more pageviews from users
  • Not Sure

Not being sure happens often with Google Analytics. Be prepared to associate these roadblocks to reporting Dimensions & Metrics.

Objective Flow Formula As Content Publisher

  1. What are the most popular blog posts that are found on my blog?
  2. Where is traffic coming from that's reading my blogs?
  3. Which devices are consuming the most blog posts?
  4. How long are blogs being consumed for?
  5. Which blogs bring in the most pageviews before exiting the site?

Ecommerce Objective Flow

Objective Flow Ecommerce Desired Outcome

Desired Outcome As Ecommerce

  • What is my conversion rate?
  • What are my transactions by channel?
  • Which region makes the most revenue?
  • Where am I seeing the least success?
  • When do customers buy?

Objective Flow Ecommerce Where Visitors Leave

Where Visitors Leave As Ecommerce

  • Sort products by conversions rates
  • Sort traffic channels by revenue totals
  • Sort locations by revenue totals
  • Ecommerce summary of least successful products by transactions
  • Review the cohort tab by time till purchase

Google Analytics Tip: Ecommerce generally is always closely connected to revenue and conversion of your products.

Objective Flow Ecommerce Where Visitors Complete Desired Outcome

Where Visitors Complete Desired Outcome As Ecommerce

Personalize to your own site

  • Study the Cart performance
  • Observe your most profitable traffic source
  • Determine why California brings in the most revenue
  • Evaluate products that bring in 0 transactions
  • How many days till you actually have a sale?

Ecommerce Objective Flow Formula

  1. What is the conversion rate by products and how is the shopping cart performing?
  2. Where are transactions coming from by channel and why is social bringing in the most revenue?
  3. Which region brings in the most revenue and why is California the most profitable?
  4. Which products are least successful and how can we improve them?
  5. When do customers buy and how many days does it take to receive a sale?

In conclusion, the outcome of this exercise was to deconstruct the Objective Flow Formula, take simple business questions and structure them. Starting from the desired outcome and doing research helps determine the most helpful places to consider looking in Google Analytics. Overall, where these outcomes occur is where more training is required and it'll start to connect between measurement questions to actually implementing.

Learn Measurement Planning: Objective Flow

Welcome to the 4th video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. As we're learning how to approach Google Analytics we quickly learn that not all websites are created equal. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defining Micro & Macro E…

Michael Zima

Welcome to the 3rd video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning.

As we know there’s many methods to approach Google Analytics and every website needs to have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
  • What user actions do you want to track?
  • Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
  • The most important measurement theory.
  • Measurement Process
  • Understand the measurement process.
  • Objective Flow
  • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  • Measurement Planning
  • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  • Reporting Types Videos
  • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  • Top Landing Pages
  • Examples of custom reports.
  • Building Custom Reports
  • How to build custom reports.
  • Segmentation Types
  • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Measurement Process

The key here is defining the tracking objectives as the starting point. Let’s quickly define 2 sets of measurement objectives: A content publishing website and an ecommerce site.

Content Publisher Measurement Objectives

  • Which posts are seeing the most visitors?
  • Where does traffic coming from?
  • What devices are users on?
  • How long do they spend on my site?
  • When do users leave my site?

Ecommerce Measurement Objectives

  • What is my conversion rate?
  • How many transactions do I have per channel?
  • Which region generates the most revenue?
  • Where am I seeing less success?
  • When do customers buy?

These 2 measurement cases will require us to explore further in the training with additional resources, examples and of course, screenshots!

Now, let’s understand how Google Analytics works fundamentally. It’s a piece of javascript that tracks browser activities on your website. There are 4 critical stages inside the measurement process that we’re going to dive into as we progress in this training.

Reporting: How Google Analytics packages the data to empower decision-makers.

Analysis: Applying measurement objectives to find the proper reports, charts, and metrics to produce answers.

Testing: Determine if your answers are present during analysis.

Segmentation: Isolate subsets of your data by drilling down into regions, traffic sources, and devices.

Those 4 steps are all going to come naturally after some experience inside of Google Analytics. It’s very binary actually, if try this exercise you’ll have a better understanding in what measurement really is.

Ask yourself, why does your website exist?

Reporting and analysis are the backbone of this thought process.

Then ask, we exist because we write great articles and sale great products.

Testing and segmentation will help your learn Google Analytics.

As you can see why and how are closely correlated during the entire measurement process.

That’s the big secret to learn Google Analytics!

Knowing how to define why and where to find how is the entire mission of this training. Later, we will breaks down into what I define as “Objective Flow” and understanding every single step a user takes. Finally, “Measurement Planning” applies everything you know from the why into the how; how do you report and segment inside of Google Analytics?

Learn Measurement Planning: Measurement Process

Welcome to the 3rd video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. As we know there’s many methods to approach Google Analytics and every website needs to have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defining Micro & Macro…

Michael Zima

Quick 60 second refresher video to follow-up on Defining Micro & Macro Events from a previous post. Follow along and begin this crash course in measurement planning. These valuable 12 minutes of videos will teach the follow topics, provide handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
  • What user actions do you want to track?
  1. Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
  • The most important measurement theory.
  • Measurement Process
  • Understand the measurement process.
  • Objective Flow
  • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  • Measurement Planning
  • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  • Reporting Types Videos
  • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  • Top Landing Pages
  • Examples of custom reports.
  • Building Custom Reports
  • How to build custom reports.
  • Segmentation Types
  • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Macro Conversion: Just like in economics, its the business outcome you need to survive.

Macro conversions are the ultimate objective that needs to be tracked. There should always be one objective that you're tracking. Common conversions types are:

  • Ecommerce Transaction
  • Form Submission
  • Spending 2 Minutes on a Webpage

There can be a wide priority of what is and isn't a macro conversion. It's very common for ecommerce websites to not have Google Analytics Ecommerce installed. This oversight will completely undervalue the entire measurement journey of your customers. Let's look at two examples that are either an ecommerce website or a content publisher. What you have to realize is both can sell products, however the Macro outcomes are different.

Ecommerce Site & Macro Events

Every ecommerce site contains product information and a shopping cart that should have revenue tracking. Other items that can be macro conversions are:

  • Users that convert at another time
  • Buying more than 1 product
  • Spending a long time on the site

There should be a few macro conversion that can clue you into behaviors on your website, be actionable to help improve and "enhance" immediate macro conversions.

Content Publisher & Macro Events

Selling products can be a macro goal for a content publisher, but they should be secondary to the mission of the website.

  • Which articles are coming up in search engines?
  • How long are people spending on my articles?
  • How are my ads performing?

There's a slight difference between these two sites. Ecommerce sites can have elaborate measurement already containing the data you need. Analysis and reviewed has to happen to build a measurement summary around predefined macro goals. Now, for a content publisher, the same can be true, but you're prepending measurement with business questions. Literally ask yourself, what is going on here and what can I do to make it better?

Micro Conversion: Interactions that lead a user into a "funnel" or series of steps attributed to one or more macro conversions.

Micro are the tiny events that need to be tracked. The clicks, the forms, and the movement of users. This flow has to be predefined in advance and in many cases overlaps into macro goals. Any click on a website can be a micro measurement objective. Let's look at the other side of the coin when reviewing our two websites.

Ecommerce Site & Micro Events

What you have to realize is user behaviors and interactions are not always a micro events. Here's some micro events for a ecommerce website.

  • Viewing many products
  • Abandoning a transaction
  • Coming back and not buying

There appears to be a measurement order of operations. Depending on a set of criteria that a developer defines for a users' experience, a measurement pro can nurture micro conversions to create more macro events.

Micro events should incubate and nurture existing macro events.

Content Publisher & Micro Events

We started with business questions to help define macro events for a content publisher. These business questions start to dilute into blocks that stack on top of themselves.

  • How many articles were read?
  • How many users left after the first article?
  • Which users segment is bad/good?

These smaller business questions should feed into each other and build upon the strategy set forth with every macro measurement objective.

Macro events are a series of micro events stacked on top of each other.

Learn Measurement Planning: Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds

Quick 60 second refresher video to follow-up on Defining Micro & Macro Events from a previous post. Follow along and begin this crash course in measurement planning. These valuable 12 minutes of videos will teach the follow topics, provide handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defining Micro & Macro Events Wh…

Michael Zima

Welcome to the 1st video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. There’s an infinite number of methods when approaching Google Analytics and websites big or small often don’t have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
  • What user actions do you want to track?
  1. Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
  • The most important measurement theory.
  • Measurement Process
  • Understand the measurement process.
  • Objective Flow
  • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  • Measurement Planning
  • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  • Reporting Types Videos
  • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  • Top Landing Pages
  • Examples of custom reports.
  • Building Custom Reports
  • How to build custom reports.
  • Segmentation Types
  • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Google Analytics Event Planning Template

First we’re going to define how to track measurement before I explain why you’re doing this.

Google Analytics Event Template

Event: Documenting the user action that happens on your website. This is denoted by a click, form submission, transaction, etc.

Google Analytics Elements Template

Elements: Define the HTML objective the user interacts with such as a button, link, form, etc. This will help with implementation later.

Google Analytics Category Template
Category: The "parent" keyword you want to label the user action. For example, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube icons can all be called: “Social”

Google Analytics Actions Template
Action: The “child” of the category that’s a keyword that’s unique to a single action. In our example it would be Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube falling under the Category of Social.

Google Analytics Label Template
Label: This 3rd value is almost exclusively used to document on which URL the user interaction occurred. We won’t worry about this now, but I use {{ URL }} which is important to Google Tag Manager tracking.

Google Analytics Conversions Template
Conversion: Is the conversion either micro or a macro conversion? Learn more about measurement planning where I discuss micro and macro conversion at length next.

Now that all the explanation is out of the way—we can start recording our own sheet. You can add this Google Sheet into your own drive to start yourself here: https://goo.gl/njKrlM

The most important part about this lesson is learning to document all of your events and identify if it's a micro or macro conversion.

It comes down to that. Becoming familiar if the event is a link click, form submission or anything else, will help you get into the measurement mindset. Documenting Categories and Actions are helpful in the beginning and are very important when tracking link clicks and form submissions.

This process is going to build the correct measurement habits when looking at your website or someone else's.

Learn Measurement Planning: Defining Micro & Macro Events

Welcome to the 1st video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. There’s an infinite number of methods when approaching Google Analytics and websites big or small often don’t have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defin…

Michael Zima