Welcome to the 3rd video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning.

As we know there’s many methods to approach Google Analytics and every website needs to have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
    • What user actions do you want to track?
  2. Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
    • The most important measurement theory.
  3. Measurement Process
    • Understand the measurement process.
  4. Objective Flow
    • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  5. Measurement Planning
    • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  6. Reporting Types Videos
    • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  7. Top Landing Pages
    • Examples of custom reports.
  8. Building Custom Reports
    • How to build custom reports.
  9. Segmentation Types
    • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Measurement Process

The key here is defining the tracking objectives as the starting point. Let’s quickly define 2 sets of measurement objectives: A content publishing website and an ecommerce site.

Content Publisher Measurement Objectives

  • Which posts are seeing the most visitors?
  • Where does traffic coming from?
  • What devices are users on?
  • How long do they spend on my site?
  • When do users leave my site?

Ecommerce Measurement Objectives

  • What is my conversion rate?
  • How many transactions do I have per channel?
  • Which region generates the most revenue?
  • Where am I seeing less success?
  • When do customers buy?

These 2 measurement cases will require us to explore further in the training with additional resources, examples and of course, screenshots!

Now, let’s understand how Google Analytics works fundamentally. It’s a piece of javascript that tracks browser activities on your website. There are 4 critical stages inside the measurement process that we’re going to dive into as we progress in this training.

Reporting: How Google Analytics packages the data to empower decision-makers.

Analysis: Applying measurement objectives to find the proper reports, charts, and metrics to produce answers.

Testing: Determine if your answers are present during analysis.

Segmentation: Isolate subsets of your data by drilling down into regions, traffic sources, and devices.

Those 4 steps are all going to come naturally after some experience inside of Google Analytics. It’s very binary actually, if try this exercise you’ll have a better understanding in what measurement really is.

Ask yourself, why does your website exist?

Reporting and analysis are the backbone of this thought process.

Then ask, we exist because we write great articles and sale great products.

Testing and segmentation will help your learn Google Analytics.

As you can see why and how are closely correlated during the entire measurement process.

That’s the big secret to learn Google Analytics!

Knowing how to define why and where to find how is the entire mission of this training. Later, we will breaks down into what I define as “Objective Flow” and understanding every single step a user takes. Finally, “Measurement Planning” applies everything you know from the why into the how; how do you report and segment inside of Google Analytics?

Learn Measurement Planning: Measurement Process

Welcome to the 3rd video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. As we know there’s many methods to approach Google Analytics and every website needs to have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defining Micro & Macro…

Michael ZimaMichael Zima

Quick 60 second refresher video to follow-up on Defining Micro & Macro Events from a previous post. Follow along and begin this crash course in measurement planning. These valuable 12 minutes of videos will teach the follow topics, provide handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
    • What user actions do you want to track?
  2. Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
    • The most important measurement theory.
  3. Measurement Process
    • Understand the measurement process.
  4. Objective Flow
    • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  5. Measurement Planning
    • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  6. Reporting Types Videos
    • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  7. Top Landing Pages
    • Examples of custom reports.
  8. Building Custom Reports
    • How to build custom reports.
  9. Segmentation Types
    • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Macro Conversion: Just like in economics, its the business outcome you need to survive.

Macro conversions are the ultimate objective that needs to be tracked. There should always be one objective that you're tracking. Common conversions types are:

  • Ecommerce Transaction
  • Form Submission
  • Spending 2 Minutes on a Webpage

There can be a wide priority of what is and isn't a macro conversion. It's very common for ecommerce websites to not have Google Analytics Ecommerce installed. This oversight will completely undervalue the entire measurement journey of your customers. Let's look at two examples that are either an ecommerce website or a content publisher. What you have to realize is both can sell products, however the Macro outcomes are different.

Ecommerce Site & Macro Events

Every ecommerce site contains product information and a shopping cart that should have revenue tracking. Other items that can be macro conversions are:

  • Users that convert at another time
  • Buying more than 1 product
  • Spending a long time on the site

There should be a few macro conversion that can clue you into behaviors on your website, be actionable to help improve and "enhance" immediate macro conversions.

Content Publisher & Macro Events

Selling products can be a macro goal for a content publisher, but they should be secondary to the mission of the website.

  • Which articles are coming up in search engines?
  • How long are people spending on my articles?
  • How are my ads performing?

There's a slight difference between these two sites. Ecommerce sites can have elaborate measurement already containing the data you need. Analysis and reviewed has to happen to build a measurement summary around predefined macro goals. Now, for a content publisher, the same can be true, but you're prepending measurement with business questions. Literally ask yourself, what is going on here and what can I do to make it better?

Micro Conversion: Interactions that lead a user into a "funnel" or series of steps attributed to one or more macro conversions.

Micro are the tiny events that need to be tracked. The clicks, the forms, and the movement of users. This flow has to be predefined in advance and in many cases overlaps into macro goals. Any click on a website can be a micro measurement objective. Let's look at the other side of the coin when reviewing our two websites.

Ecommerce Site & Micro Events

What you have to realize is user behaviors and interactions are not always a micro events. Here's some micro events for a ecommerce website.

  • Viewing many products
  • Abandoning a transaction
  • Coming back and not buying

There appears to be a measurement order of operations. Depending on a set of criteria that a developer defines for a users' experience, a measurement pro can nurture micro conversions to create more macro events.

Micro events should incubate and nurture existing macro events.

Content Publisher & Micro Events

We started with business questions to help define macro events for a content publisher. These business questions start to dilute into blocks that stack on top of themselves.

  • How many articles were read?
  • How many users left after the first article?
  • Which users segment is bad/good?

These smaller business questions should feed into each other and build upon the strategy set forth with every macro measurement objective.

Macro events are a series of micro events stacked on top of each other.

Learn Measurement Planning: Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds

Quick 60 second refresher video to follow-up on Defining Micro & Macro Events from a previous post. Follow along and begin this crash course in measurement planning. These valuable 12 minutes of videos will teach the follow topics, provide handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defining Micro & Macro Events…

Michael ZimaMichael Zima

Welcome to the 1st video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. There’s an infinite number of methods when approaching Google Analytics and websites big or small often don’t have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement.

  1. Defining Micro & Macro Events
    • What user actions do you want to track?
  2. Micro & Macro Explained in 60 Seconds
    • The most important measurement theory.
  3. Measurement Process
    • Understand the measurement process.
  4. Objective Flow
    • What are the objectives you to know during measurement?
  5. Measurement Planning
    • Define a measurement plan and begin to implement it.
  6. Reporting Types Videos
    • What types of reports explain your measurement story?
  7. Top Landing Pages
    • Examples of custom reports.
  8. Building Custom Reports
    • How to build custom reports.
  9. Segmentation Types
    • How to drill-down into your measurement results.

Google Analytics Event Planning Template

First we’re going to define how to track measurement before I explain why you’re doing this.

Google Analytics Event Template

Event: Documenting the user action that happens on your website. This is denoted by a click, form submission, transaction, etc.

Google Analytics Elements Template

Elements: Define the HTML objective the user interacts with such as a button, link, form, etc. This will help with implementation later.

Google Analytics Category Template Category: The "parent" keyword you want to label the user action. For example, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube icons can all be called: “Social”

Google Analytics Actions Template Action: The “child” of the category that’s a keyword that’s unique to a single action. In our example it would be Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube falling under the Category of Social.

Google Analytics Label Template Label: This 3rd value is almost exclusively used to document on which URL the user interaction occurred. We won’t worry about this now, but I use {{ URL }} which is important to Google Tag Manager tracking.

Google Analytics Conversions Template Conversion: Is the conversion either micro or a macro conversion? Learn more about measurement planning where I discuss micro and macro conversion at length next.

Now that all the explanation is out of the way—we can start recording our own sheet. You can add this Google Sheet into your own drive to start yourself here: https://goo.gl/njKrlM

The most important part about this lesson is learning to document all of your events and identify if it's a micro or macro conversion.

It comes down to that. Becoming familiar if the event is a link click, form submission or anything else, will help you get into the measurement mindset. Documenting Categories and Actions are helpful in the beginning and are very important when tracking link clicks and form submissions.

This process is going to build the correct measurement habits when looking at your website or someone else's.

Learn Measurement Planning: Defining Micro & Macro Events

Welcome to the 1st video in a 9 part mini-series to measurement planning. There’s an infinite number of methods when approaching Google Analytics and websites big or small often don’t have a plan in place. In 12 minutes of videos you will learn the following topics, receive handouts, and have a constructive approach to measurement. Defin…

Michael ZimaMichael Zima

It appears Google is doing a slow rollout of their new Analytics 360 Navigation to their freemium Tier.

I did not see this on my personal account, but this was present on my power user account.

New Google Analytics UI Navigation Google did a paint job around the top navigation and it makes navigating to other accounts a snap, keywords, id numbers, and simple wizard navigations.

New Google Analytics UI Menu

  • Google Analytics
  • Tag Manager
  • Data Studio

Are all surfacing with these new changes. It's great to see the inner-integration with all these great services.

Here's a quick snapshot of Google Tag Manager UI in case you're interested.

New Google Tag Manager UI

New Google Analytics User Interface!

It appears Google is doing a slow rollout of their new Analytics 360 Navigation to their freemium Tier. I did not see this on my personal account, but this was present on my power user account. Google did a paint job around the top navigation and it makes navigating to other accounts a snap, keywords, id numbers, and simple wizard navi…

Michael ZimaMichael Zima

Video 2: Walking through click to call, form submission, and implementation strategy.

This is a follow up to Deconstructing What is Google Tag Manager

Welcome back! It's been a long road coming here to this post. Quick recap: Was hired this year to build full-time at Praxis Metrics, accomplished my 5 year goal of moving to Europe (Barcelona), and finally have a vision of the future.

What is a click?

A click-to-call is used as an example. Watch as we dive into the trigger to what it really does. Briefly you'll learn the following:

  1. What is trigger
  2. How it's configured
  3. The inner workings of what triggers do

Default Trigger Setting

Google Tag Manager Trigger Default

  • Page URL
  • mactches RegEx
  • .*

Simply put, Page URL is looking for "all" pages that have a period, star (.*) which means all URL on your domain. Regular Expression is outside the scope of this tutorial.

The period, star tells Tag Manager that this trigger can potentially fire on every page.

Finding HTML Elements

In the example, I'm looking for the click-to-call number. The most important part of Google Tag Manager help is really learning about the developer tools inside of Google Chrome.

Scroll down to the button, right click, and select "Inspect" to see what's under the hood of the website.

Google Tag Manager Inspect HTML Element

<a href="tel:2047745555">Click here to call us now at 1-204-774-5555.</a>

Contains the code of the Link Click feature and you want to target the href HTML element. Everything inside of the quotes is going to be put into the trigger field in Step 4.

When that's all said and done you'll have a trigger that's completed.

Google Tag Manager Click URL Phone Number

  1. Click URL
  2. Contains
  3. tel:2047745555

Google Tag Manager is enabled on #3 and it Fires On #4. These are the two pieces to every tigger that make it work. There's more to this tutorial, but I'll leave the rest for the video.

Deconstructing Google Tag Manager: Triggers

Video 2: Walking through click to call, form submission, and implementation strategy. This is a follow up to Deconstructing What is Google Tag Manager Welcome back! It's been a long road coming here to this post. Quick recap: Was hired this year to build full-time at Praxis Metrics, accomplished my 5 year goal of moving to Europe (Barcel…

Michael ZimaMichael Zima

This is the first installment of a 3 part mini-series that reviews 3 keys steps in the Google Tag Manager implementation process. These pieces will be reviewing Tag Manger for a lead generation site. Going through click tags, form tags, and general tags when it gets progressively harder.

Video 1: Deconstructing what is Google Tag Manager?

Video 2: Walking through click to call, form submission, and implementation strategy.

Video 3: Troubleshooting a difficult tag that won’t fire or register a hit.

Variables Tabs

Google Tag Manager Variable Tab

Select all these buttons and turn them on.

Variables: Can be constants that can hold, modify, and change various inputs.

The Variables tab is the most important section inside of the dashboard. These built in variables will eliminate the noise regarding what is Google Tag Manager when thoroughly understood.Pages & Event are the only set that are enabled by default.

Make sure to click all the checkboxes under Clicks and Forms to allow you to "select" these built in features when constructing your very first Tag. There's a whole range of custom presents that should be considered and here's a couple we need to utilize the best entry-level feature of all: Event Tracking.

gaProperty

Google Tag Manager Analytics Variable

Create a custom variable containing your very own Google Analytics tracking ID. This variable allows you to store it as a constant without having to enter it every time.

URL Destination

Google Tag Manager URL Destination

Filter that will display the full URL when constructed into a Tag. This variable will be used to help construct event tracking and will report on what URL these events occur on.

Creating Your First Tag

Creating Your First Event Tracking Tag

  1. Label it
  2. Google Analytics by Default - there’s a lot of built in goodies
  3. Universal Analytics is by default
  4. Handle bars {{ will automatically generate the variable you’ve entered
  5. Display Features - future proof your tags
  6. Default is Page View

It's important to select the Event from the dropdown menu to build a correct event tracking tag.

When reviewing what is Google Tag Manager - you'll see it's a simple builder that take user action to do this or that. If you're interested in implementing your first tag, you'll have to learn about installing google tag manager in this post.

The difference with the selected "event" tag are the all too familiar event tracking fields appear.

Category, Action, Label - This is for event tracking. It's best to consider a type of naming convention to keep these separated and organized. The final piece is the {{URL Destination}} which will always be placed inside of Label field and when a global action (such as a footer link) is clicked; the position of the user will be recorded where they're on the site. Sorting links by which page generates the most actions is a handy report to evaluate engagement performance.

Take your event tracking template and turn it into a custom report in this tutorial. Acting on event tracking information will allow for detailed analysis that garner useful insights.

Deconstructing What is Google Tag Manager

This is the first installment of a 3 part mini-series that reviews 3 keys steps in the Google Tag Manager implementation process. These pieces will be reviewing Tag Manger for a lead generation site. Going through click tags, form tags, and general tags when it gets progressively harder. Video 1: Deconstructing what is Google Tag Manager…

Michael ZimaMichael Zima